Bay Family

Bay Family

Bay Family of Southern Ohio Riverboat Captains and their boats.

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ARION - operated by Sallie Bay Smith and Family.
ARION - operated by Sallie Bay Smith and Family.
While speaking of Sallie Bay Smith, it of interest to state that she was the mother of six children. She was long active in the operation of the ferry at Proctorville and her children followed in her footsteps. Her two sons, Capt. George W. Smith, Sr. and Capt. Ed Smith (both deceased) operated ferry boats at Proctorville. First the Whisper and later the Arion. They knew the river and served the public faithfully many years. Of the four girls were Josephine Smith Roush, Hattie Smith Morrison, Virgie Smith Thomas and Fritz Smith Kitts.  
 
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BONANZA - owned by the Bay Brothers
BONANZA - owned by the Bay Brothers
BONANZA - owned by the Bay Brothers
Other boats built by the Bay's were: "J. C. Crossley," "Rosedale," "City of Ironton," "Minnie Bay," "Louise", "Chevalier," "Lizzie Bay," "Henry M. Stanley," "Ruth," "Ruth #2," " "Chesapeake," "Kanawha," "Bay Queen," and the "Greyhound." Some of the other boats owned and operated by the Bay's were: "A. L. Norton," "Falcon," "B. T. Enos." "Georgia," "Hanging Rock," "Sandy Valley," "Urania," "Nora Belle," (also a mail boat) "Fannie Dugan," "Greenwood," "Bay Line," "Virginia," "Queen City," "Stella", "Katie," "Bonanza," and the "Volunteer." The Bay brothers were the most prominent steamboat men ever to live in Lawrence county. They were known all over the western waters as the leading steamboatmen on the Ohio River. They built, owned and operated more than 40 boats during their more than 50 years in the steamboat business, building some of the largest and fastest boats on the River.  
 
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CHEVALIER - Built for the Bay Line
CHEVALIER - Built for the Bay Line
CHEVALIER
1003
Stw p wh b. Mason City, W. Va., 1888. 131.2x22x3.3. Engines, 13 1/2’s-3 1/2 ft. Two boilers, each 42” by 18 ft. Built for the Bay Line and long ran Huntington-Gallipolis under ownership of Capt. M. E. Brown, Gallipolis, with Capt. A. H. Brown, Guyandotte, master. Capt. Dick Brown also was master-pilot. On May 22, 1907, at 1:00 A.M., she burned at the C&O wharfboat, Huntington. The fire department could not reach her due to the road being blocked by the C&O freight cars.
 
 
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Elizabeth Bay
Elizabeth Bay
 
 
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George Bay and His Family
George Bay and His Family
 
 
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GREYHOUND
GREYHOUND
Description from Way's Packet Directory
GREYHOUND
2464
Stw p wh b. Ironton, Oh., 1901. 150x23x4. Engines 14’s-5 ft. Two boilers, each 43” by 22 ft. Built by Capts. William and George Bay. Capt. Jesse P. Hughes explains in this way: “The Bays built a ‘lighter’ flat at the same time they built the KANAWHA at Ironton in 1896 , using same material. The KANAWHA used it for low water work. Capt. William E. Roe bought the KANAWHA on Nov. 10, 1899, but the Bays kept the lighter at Ironton. Later they beached it high and dry in a flood, put a model bow on one end, and a shaped stern on the other, and this became the hull of the GREYHOUND. She got old engines which had been stored in the Ironton wharfboat. “ She ran in the Portsmouth-Proctorville trade, was quite fast, and any boat which could lick her was “going some.” Capt. Tom Roush was master for a long time, later Capt. Pete Lallance. Chief engineer was Charles L. Brown. She was laid up and in use as a wharfboat at Ironton when lost in ice Dec. 31, 1917.
 
 
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INDIANA and E. R. ANDREWS
Competitors of the Bay Line of Boats
INDIANA and E. R. ANDREWS Competitors of the Bay Line of Boats
Ironton Register Feb. 28, 1901 - PACKET WAR HAS BEGUN - Commodore F. A. Laidley, president of the White Collar Line, Wednesday made the first move of what will develop into a severe competition with the Bay Bros., now operating the URANIA in the Ironton trade. In placing the new steamer INDIANA in the Vanceburg-Cincinnati trade Wednesday, Laidley renews a fight for the traffic in the upper river with the Bays that has existed for years. In hopes of ending it the White Collar Line bought out the Bays, paying them $5 per day for five years to keep out of Cincinnati ports with their boats. - Cincinnati Post. 
 
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Lizzie Bay and Henry M. Stanley
Lizzie Bay and Henry M. Stanley
Description from Way's Packet Directory
LIZZIE BAY
3529
Stw p wh b. Madison, Ind., 1886. 150x30.8x4. Engines, 14’s-5ft. Two boilers, each 42” by 20 ft. Built for the Bay Line. Came out in the Parkersburg-Middleport trade, Capt. George B. McClintock, with J. W. Deem, clerk. Soon entered the Pittsburgh-Charleston trade. Capt. J. M. Keever was master in 1890. She was lengthened to 181 ft., and a texas added while in this trade. In February 1893 she failed to back while landing at the Parkersburg wharfboat in the mouth of Little Kanawha River and hit the B&O bridge knocking down her stacks and pilothouse. The Bays sold her on Nov. 26, 1895, to the White Collar Line, Cincinnati. They ran her usually Cincinnati-Madison, but sometimes upriver as well. Hit a coal barge at Ludlow, Ky., Dec. 8, 1905, and sank. Again sank at Cincinnati, foot of Main Street, June 1909. Dismantled at the Howard Ship Yard, Jeffersonville, Ind., in 1912, and her engines and part of the cabin went into the building the CORKER. A tradition is handed down that once during high water she was taken up Big Hocking River to Coolville, Oh., for freight, this before lengthening. She was popularly known as the “Lousy Liz.”



HENRY M. STANLEY
2602
Stw p wh b. Murraysville, W. Va. at the Flesher Yard, 1890. 180x32.4x5.5. Engines from towboat JOHN HANNA. Built for the Bay Brothers for the Cincinnati-Charleston trade. Ran competition with the White Collar Line’s boats, usually SHERLEY. Manager Fred A. Laidley of White Collar bought the STANLEY in 1895 thus ending the fray. On Feb. 1, 1900, hit the Southern Bridge, Cincinnati, sank, drowning one. Raised March 20, and repaired at Madison, Ind. On Apr. 4, 1900, just off the ways, she collided with the coal tow of the JOSEPH WALTON at Rising Sun, Ind., and again sank. She was raised April 10, and returned to Madison to again go on the ways. Sold in 1904 to Greene Line Steamers who ran her Cincinnati-Pomeroy-Charleston. On Sept. 3, 1907, she was downbound in fog at Gallipolis Island and hit the U. S. dredge OSWEGO engaged in dredging the channel. She sank and as preparations were under way to raise her she burned. Her wheel shaft and flanges lay in the mud at the Acme Boiler Works, Gallipolis for years. Whistle went to the ISLAND QUEEN (first). Machinery went to the GREENLAND (see). Capt. Jesse P. Hughes says she was the last boat built at the Flesher Yard, Murraysville. Jack Flesher, who ran it, went to Levanna, Oh., and ran the Barrett Yard thereafter.
 
 
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Mary Bay
Mary Bay
 
 
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MINNIE
MINNIE
Description from Way's Packet Directory
MINNIE
3957
Stw p wh b. Indian Guyan, Oh., 1864. 84.4 x 14.3 x 3.31 tons. She was bult on the lower side of the creek, where Bradrick, Oh., is today, opposite Huntington, W. Va. Owned by Capts. William and George Bay, their first boat. While they were building her the Confederates made a raid, shot George twice, and wounded his sister Sallie in the ankle. Will Bay, hearing the racket, killed two of the Confederates and wounded another. The boat ran Ironton-Proctorville. They sold her south in 1867 to Capt. Samuel R. Bell, St. Martin Parish, La. Off the lists in 1869. Named for the eldest daughter of Capt. George Bay.
 
 
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MINNIE BAY and Advertisement
MINNIE BAY and Advertisement
Description from Way's Packet Directory
MINNIE BAY
3965
SW p wh b. Belle Vernon, Pa. (hull), and completed at Wheeling, W. Va., 1883. 182x27x4.7. Engines, 15’s-5 ft. Three boilers, each 40” by 24 ft., two flues 14” dia. Came out with staggered buckets 18 ft. dia. wheels, working buckets 12 ft. across, 24” dip. She was built at the Wm. McFall yard and engines, etc., from A. J. Sweeney. Built for the Bay brothers for the Portsmouth-Proctorville trade and named for George Bay’s daugher Minnie. Minnie married Don Eaton, Proctorville, and died there, 74, October 1938, her husband surviving. In 1885 and 1886 ran Parkersburg-Gallipolis, Capt. G. B. McClintock, with John M. Deem, clerk. She later ran Cincinnati-Madison, Capt. Edwin F. Maddy, competing with the Mail Line, which ended with the Mail Line buying her. They ran her Cincinnati-Maysville. She was downbound Manchester, Oh., to Cincinnati with an excursion party aboard when she was snagged and sunk opposite Moscow, Oh., on Oct. 15, 1889.
 
 
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Mr. and Mrs George Bay
Mr. and Mrs George Bay
I love this picture! 
 
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Mr. and Mrs. George Bay
Mr. and Mrs. George Bay
 
 
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RUTH NO. 2
RUTH NO. 2
Description from Way's Packet Directory
RUTH NO. 2
4883
Stw p wh b. Clarington, Oh., 1904. 141 tons. 136.7x26.7x3.6. Cross compound engines, 10” and 16”-6ft. One boiler. Built for the Bay Line, Ironton, Oh., and was entered in the Sistersville-Wheeling trade, Capt. Michael B. Davis, master, with Charles Higgs, chief engineer. In the summer of 1906 sold to the Callahan Line and operated on the Apalachicola and Flint rivers between Bainbridge, Ga., and Apalachicola, Fla., 172 miles. A texas was added. In 1913 she was sold to the Columbia (S.C.) Railway & Navigation Co., and was taken to Georgetown, S.C., to serve on the Santee and Congaree rivers. She ran there until wrecked at Columbia, S.C., in 1918. Many details and pictures in S&D Reflector, June 1969 issue, pages 5-7.
 
 
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Sarah Bay
Sarah Bay
"Aunt Sarah" written on back of photo 
 
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Willie Bay
Willie Bay